In the News

Portland brewery introduces CBD-infused beer
KGW 8 | July 10, 2018
Products containing cannabidiol, or CBD, are on the rise, from massage oil to beer, but how safe are they? Nephi Stella, PhD, is interviewed.

Seattle seniors choosing cannabis over opioids for pain
King 5 News | July 6, 2018
More seniors are choosing cannabis over opioids saying it’s just as effective without the negative side effects. Nephi Stella, PhD, weighs in on the benefits of using CBD to treat seizures, and to fight gioblastomas, pain, anxiety, PTSD and some cancers.

From apps to avatars, new tools for taking control of your mental health
The Washington Post | July 2, 2018
In an article that looks at the burgeoning world of digital mental health tools, Dror Ben-Zeev, PhD, discusses a smartphone app called FOCUS designed to help people with severe mental illness manage their symptoms.

Perspective: Less than half of adults not screened for depression
Helio | June 28, 2018
Recent findings show only 48% of American adults in the general population are screened for depression. John Kern, MD, offers a perspective on the impact of this missed opportunity and how primary care-based depression care interventions can help.

What Every Parent Needs to Know About Gaming Disorder
Reader's Digest | June 27, 2018
Andy Saxon, MD, talks about the importance of having a psychiatrist or psychologist assess and treat gaming disorders, and Pat Areán's Project EVO is highlighted in a link from the story reminding us that video games can be beneficial as well.

Science Says: What makes something truly addictive
AP News | June 21, 2018
The new “gaming disorder” classification from the World Health Organization revives a debate in the medical community about whether behaviors can cause the same kind of addictive illness as drugs. Andy Saxon, MD, talks about how dopamine comes into play.

World Health Organization says video game addiction is a disease. Why American psychiatrists don't
Los Angeles Times | June 19, 2018
Andy Saxon, MD, discusses why the American Psychiatric Association opted not to include internet gaming disorder to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM).

Expanding access to mental health care through telemental health
The Washington Nurse | Spring, 2018 (pg 24)
Cara Towle gives examples of how nurses are vital components of the telemental health services provided by UW Medicine, including the Psychiatry Consultation and Telepsychiatry (PCAT) program, the Psychiatry and Addictions Case Consultation (PACC) series, and thier liaison role in Collaborative Care.

Suicide rate up in all regions of Washington — but why?
The Seattle Times | June 14, 2018
Christopher DeCou, PhD, senior fellow at Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center and a collaborator with the Kate Comtois Lab, says no one is exactly sure why the suicide rates continue to go up, despite the tremendous effort to try to understand the reasons people hurt or kill themselves.

Helping a friend or loved one who might be suicidal
KOMO News | June 13, 2018
Anna Ratzliff, MD, PhD, says even if someone isn't talking about wanting to die, there are typically warning signs, such as a change in behavior, that may indicate that person is struggling with suicidal thoughts.

Bourdain, Spade suicides highlight resources available, new state law to expand suicide prevention
KIRO 7 | June 8, 2018
It's a common misconception that if you talk to someone about suicide, it will make him or her more likely to harm themselves or die by suicide, says Anna Ratzliff, MD, PhD. Dr. Ratzliff is one of the authors of All Patients Safe, an online suicide prevention training program for medical providers.

Treating Mental Illness
KIRO 7 | June, 2018
KIRO 7 interviewed Dror Ben-Zeev, PhD, about the BRiTE Center's FOCUS app, a mobile app for treating severe mental illness. A recently concluded, three-year study found the app to be significantly better at getting patients to engage in treatment than a scheduled trip to the clinic. Also covered on the UW Medicine Newsroom.

Do I Have Postpartum Depression or Just the Baby Blues?
Right as Rain | May 21, 2018
Amritha Bhat, MD, MPH, and Deb Cowley, MD, co-directors of the Perinatal Psychiatry Clinic at UW Medical Center-Roosevelt, talk about the difference between common “baby blues” and postpartum depression.
 
What to Say (and Not to Say) to Someone with Anxiety
Right as Rain | May 18, 2018
Anxiety disorders are one of the most common types of mental illness—and they’re on the rise. Ty Lostutter, PhD, provides tips on how to talk to and be supportive of anxious friends.
 
To treat pain, look at more than the 1-10 scale
UW Medicine Newsroom | May 4, 2018
Clinicians and researchers at UW Medicine’s Center for Pain Relief created an in-depth questionnaire adaptable to any primary care clinic which was recently published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. The tool has helped primary care providers assess, treat, and manage chronic pain. Co-author Mark Sullivan, MD, PhD, is quoted.
 
The long legacy of concussions
The Huddle | April 30, 2018
Jesse Fann, MD, is interviewed about the recent study he led which found that traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases the risk of developing dementia.
 
Understanding sexual assault decades before #MeToo
The Huddle | April 30, 2018
When Lucy Berliner, MSW, HCSATS, was offered her internship at Harborview as a UW social work graduate student, she had no idea she would help shape the field of medical and counseling care for sexual assault survivors.
 
Sexual assault study works to improve recovery for survivors through immediate intervention
The UW Daily | April 29, 2018
Michele Bedard-Gilligan, PhD, and Emily Dworkin, PhD, discuss how their new study aims to help women who experience sexual assault get intervention early on.
 
Teens who get more sleep may curb screen time
Business Insider | April 27, 2018
Michelle Garrison, PhD, comments on results published in Sleep Medicine that found teens who get extra sleep on school nights might cut back mostly on sedentary activities like screen time rather than exercise.
 
Doctors Receive Opioid Training. Big Pharma Funds It. What Could Go Wrong?
Mother Jones | April 27, 2018
The FDA requires pharmaceutical companies to fund Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) classes for select drugs. Mark Sullivan, MD, PhD, recounts his struggles with the REMS requirements.
 
Brain injury blood test to help concussion sufferers return to play
Horsetalk | April 26, 2018
The results of the recent study by Jesse Fann, MD, published in The Lancet Psychiatry was widely covered, including in New Zealand's Horsetalk. Being featured in an equine-related publication may be a first for our department!
 
‘She was a super suicidal person’
The UW Daily | April 26, 2018
In the world of addiction psychiatry, there is no hard line between medications and drugs. Christine Yuodelis-Flores, MD, and Rick Ries, MD, are interviewed about their nearly three decades of work in addiction psychiatry at Harborview.
 
UW Medicine announces plan to open new 12-bed psychiatric unit at Northwest Hospital & Medical Center
The Huddle | April 20, 2018
UW Medicine announced today that it will open a new 12-bed voluntary psychiatric inpatient unit at Northwest Hospital & Medical Center in the fall of 2019. In the same timeframe, the 10-bed psychiatric unit at UW Medical Center will close as it will no longer meet updated regulatory standards set by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.
 
Risk of dementia increases with traumatic brain injury
The Huddle | April 17, 2018
A large study led by Jesse Fann, MD, found that traumatic brain injury increases the risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. The story was widely covered, appearing among 171 outlets in 42 states as well as several countries.
 
Are Women with Autism Getting Overlooked?
Right as Rain | April 13, 2018
Sara Webb, PhD, talks about the difficulty in diagnosing autism in girls and the possibilty that gender-specific diagnostic criteria might help.
 
Marijuana may reduce opioids, but it's not the solution
KUOW | April 12, 2018
Two reports released this month showed a decline in opioid prescriptions in states that have legalized medical marijuana. Andrew Saxon, MD, says the reports support alternatives to opioid prescriptions, but the addiction crisis is far from solved.
 
Brain injuries increase dementia risk, study finds
BBC News | April 11, 2018
Jesse Fann, MD, recently published a study which offers more evidence of a link between traumatic brain injuries and dementia later in life, with repeated injuries and severe ones posing the greatest danger. The story was covered in multiple outlets, including US News and World Report.
 
Rethinking therapy: How 45 questions can revolutionize mental health care in Canada
The Globe and Mail | April 7, 2018
Therapy is a tried-and-true treatment for what ails our minds, but it hasn’t caught up with medicine in tracking the data needed to make patients better. Could simple surveys help change that? Tony Rousmaniere, PsyD, is interviewed.
 
Ineffective treatment often prescribed for lower back pain, report says
KUOW | April 5, 2018
Pain management doctors and researchers say they would like to see a shift toward evidence-based treatments that recent guidelines recommend — emphasizing nonpharmacological treatments for most patients. Judith Turner, PhD, is quoted.
 
Studies Link Legal Marijuana With Fewer Opioid Prescriptions
The New York Times | April 2, 2018
Can legalizing marijuana fight the problem of opioid addiction and fatal overdoses? Two new studies in the debate suggest it may. Andrew Saxon, MD, co-wrote an accompanying editorial for the studies. Dr. Saxon was interviewed by the Associated Press, and the story was published in numerous newspapers, TV and radio sites across the country.
 
Never Waver
acceleratemed.org | April, 2018
Read this terrific profile of William Womack, MD, a former resident, fellow and faculty member in our department. He was the first African American to join our faculty and went on to have a remarkable career, including serving as Division Chief for Psychiatry at both Harborview and Seattle Children’s.
 
The Top Doctors in Seattle for 2018
Seattle Magazine | April, 2018
We’re proud to report that once again Seattle Magazine’s annual Top Doctors report features a number of our faculty members. Congratulations to Jesse Fann, MD, Lina Fine, MD, Ray Hsiao, MD, Hower Kwon, MD, Kenneth Melman, MD, Richard Ries, MD, Carol Rockhill, MD, PhD, Gregory Simon, MD, Mark Snowden, MD, and Christine Yuodelis-Flores, MD.
 
Q & A with Top Doctor Ray Hsiao
Seattle Magazine | April, 2018
Ray Hsiao, MD, shares insights into combating opioid addiction and on how Washington state is stepping up to integrate treatment of these complex issues.
 
Trump opioid plan writes in favoritism to single company’s addiction medication
STAT | March 26, 2018
The White House’s national strategy to combat the opioid crisis would expand a particular kind of addiction treatment in federal criminal justice settings. Andrew Saxon, MD, believes doctors and patients should have options in choosing a medication.
 
Naltrexone versus buprenorphine for opioid use disorder
UpToDate Talk | March, 2018
Andrew Saxon, MD, discusses treatments for opioid use disorder. This podcast has had almost 5,000 listens since it was dropped ten days ago. People can also search UpToDate Talk on itunes.
 
Care Partners: How Philanthropy Can Kick-Start Programs to Engage Community and Family Members to Improve Depression Care for Older Adults
Grant Makers Health | March, 2018
Jürgen Unützer, MD, MPH, MA, Theresa Hoeft, PhD, and colleagues at UC Davis, with support from the Archstone Foundation, are testing enhanced collaborative care programs developed through partnerships between primary care clinics and community-based organizations and/or family care partners caring for depressed older adults.
 
New Study Aims to Help Soldiers with PTSD
King 5 | March 16, 2018
The UW is conducting a study to help soldiers with PTSD by evaluating the effectiveness of a Stress Check that connects them with resources and provides counseling over the phone. Debra Kaysen, PhD, and Denise Walker, PhD, co-lead the study.
 
Initiative Announces Award of 2018 Pilot Research Grants
Population Health | March 13, 2018
We had another strong showing in the UW Population Health Initiative Research Grants, with three of the seven newly funded proposals including psychiatry and behavioral sciences faculty. Awards were given to Paul Borghesani, MD, PhD and Anna Ratzliff, MD, PhD, (Lethal Means Assessment in Psychiatric Emergency Services for Suicide Prevention), Myra Parker, JD, MPH, PhD, (Mama Ammaan (Safe Mother) Project: African Mother-to-Mother Antenatal Assistance Network (AMMAAN)) and Carol Rockhill, MD, (Using Digital Learning Tools to Enhance Emotional Regulation for Youth Hospitalized for Aggressive Crises).

UW study offers help to soldiers with signs of PTSD
UW News | March 12, 2018
Debra Kaysen, MPH, is co-leading a new study with Denise Walker (School of Social Work) called UW Stress Check, which identifies soldiers who are experiencing PTSD symptoms in order to connect them with resources and provide counseling over the phone. Covered by KOMO 4.

New director of global mental health at UW brings wealth of experience
UW Medicine Newsroom | March 2, 2018
Pamela Collins, MD, MPH, recently joined the UW as the director of global mental health, a joint program between the departments of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and global health.

Is Your Chest Pain a Heart Attack or Anxiety?
Right as Rain | February 23, 2018
Mark Sullivan, MD, gives key advice on differentiating chest pains and reminds us that it is always better to be safe than sorry in regards to your heart.

Expanding Use of Brief Behavioral Interventions in Collaborative Care
Psychiatric News | February 22, 2018
Patrick Raue, PhD, talks about why behavioral interventions not used more frequently in primary care, and what can be done to address the barriers.

New Curriculum Prioritizes Tribal Sovereignty, Cultural Respect in Scientific Research of American Indian, Alaska Native Communities
UW News | February 22, 2018
Myra Parker, JD, MPH, PhD, co-authored a new curriculum which intends to enhance research capabilities and increase participation in federally funded studies with American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

Proposed new 'sexting' law could give teens a break
Kiro 7 | February 15, 2018
Sexting is currently a felony and convicted teens are forced to register as sex offenders if convicted. A new bill moving forward in the state legislature would reduce the charge of felony to a misdemeanor if a teen is caught sharing other's nude photos. Sarah Walker, PhD, testifed in favor of this bill stating that the current charges work against our long-term interest in making sure teens are held accountable.

This Is Your Body on Love
Right as Rain | February 14, 2018
Love has fueled creation, destruction and pretty much every human endeavor in between. What is it that makes love so powerful? Larry Zweifel, PhD, explains how the feeling of love affects the human body.

Addressing the Escalating Psychiatrist Shortage
AAMCNews | February 13, 2018
More people are seeking mental health treatment, but there aren’t enough psychiatrists to meet the demand. Anna Ratzliff, MD, PhD, talks about the appeal of the team-based Collaborative Care approach.

Prenatal Ultrasonography and the Incidence of Autism Spectrum Disorder
JAMA Pediatrics | February 12, 2018
Sara Jane Webb, PhD, and Pierre Mourad, PhD, (neurological surgery) comment on a recently published paper, saying the study does not support ultrasound as a primary contributor to ASD and that more work is needed on understanding ultrasound safety, particularly in the first trimester in fetuses who may may be more vulnerable to poor neurodevelopment.

One Isn’t the Loneliest Number: Self-Care for Singles
Right as Rain | February 12, 2018
Georganna Sedlar, PhD, talks about the crucial difference between being lonley and being single and offers some tips on how to embrace your awesome single self.

What to Do When You New Year's Resolutions Run out of Steam
Right as Rain | January 26, 2018
Clinical psychologist Patrick Raue, PhD, gives step by step advice on how to fine tune and adjust your New Year's resolutions if you've lost your initial motivation and momentum.

7 Takeaways from Davos
Fortune | January 26, 2018
A reporter sums up one important takeaway from the World Economic Forum recently held in Davos, Switzerland: the mental health disorder time bomb is upon us. Pamela Collins, MD, MPH, discusses the significant lack of care given to those with mental disorders.

Tackling an Epidemic
IEEE Pulse | January 25, 2018
New and emerging treatments for opioid addiction hope to offer solutions to the crisis. Richard Ries, MD, explains the impact opioids have on the body and ways of effectively treating those who are addicted.

How to Handle and Prevent Work Burnout
Right as Rain | January 22, 2018
Working too much or in a high-stress environment is associated with anxiety, depression and other psychological ills. Matthew MacKinnon, MD, (PGY-3) explains the importance of the organizational environment in combating burnout and how to address it.

Washington puts primary care providers on the frontline of suicide prevention
Healthline | January 16, 2018
An overview article of All Patients Safe, a suicide prevention training for providers developed by UW Medicine and Forefront Suicide Prevention in partnership with Seattle Children’s, CoMotion and the VA. Visit apsafe.org​ for more information.

Financial Viability and Sustainability of Integrated Care
Psychiatric News | January 16, 2018
Andrew Carlo, MD, Acting Instructor and Senior Fellow in the Psychiatry in Primary Care Fellowship, explains the complexity and promise of financial viability and sustainabilty within intergrated health care systems.

Study buddies or drug abuse?​
The Daily | January 8, 2018
Many college students believe that nonmedical prescription stimulants like Adderall, Vyvanse, or Ritalin bolster their study habits and help them get higher grades, but these misperceptions can be dangerous. A study in Addictive Behaviors by Irene Geisner, PhD, Jason Kilmer, PhD, Nicole Fossos-Wong, Jih-Cheng Yeh, Isaac Rhew, PhD, Christine Lee, PhD, and Mary Larimer, PhD, among others, is referenced. Dr. Kilmer is quoted.

Painkillers are fueling the opioid epidemic
The Daily | January 4, 2018
Mark Sullivan, MD, PhD, explains the negative effect that over prescription and use of opioid painkillers for chronic and acute pain has on addiction and dependence.

Marijuana Myths
King 5 | January 4, 2018
Dennis Donnovan, PhD, MA, gives clarity to common myths surrounding marijuana use and its effects.


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